Doctor-Patient Near-Death & Shared Death Experiences: The Gifts & Aftermath

Jeff Olsen, spoke at the 2018 IANDS Bellevue, Washington Conference Thursday Evening Special Presentation along with Dr. Jeff O'Driscoll, Olsen's Emergency Trauma Room Doctor who had a Shared Death Experience.  

 

Dr. Yvonne Kason Speaking on Spiritually Transformative Experiences

Dr. Yvonne Kason spoke at the 2018 IANDS Bellevue, Washington Conference presenting on Spiritually Transformative Experiences (STE) and moderating a Panel of STExperiencers.  

 

Thoughts From Our Board: Dr. Scott Taylor

IANDS Treasurer & Shared Near-Death Experiencer

"There's lots of different ways people can touch the Light and become transformed by it. This is one of the reasons to come to our Conference!"  

Dr Oz Show hosts 2018 IANDS Conference Speakers

Dr Oz Eben Alexander Dr Mary Neal

Dr. Oz Show hosted two 2018 IANDS Conference speakers: Dr. Eben Alexander & Dr. Mary Neal

An EMT declared orthopedic surgeon Dr. Mary Neal cold to the touch and dead. Neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander was in a coma and said he died as well. The two doctors open up about their near-death experiences with Dr. Oz. Click on this link to view: Dr. Oz Show

Dr. Rebecca Valla Interviewed on Outer Limits Radio

Rebecca IANDS Board Member, Dr. Rebecca Valla, M.D., was interviewed on Outer Limits Radio, April, 2018.

Rebecca discusses how to process the pain & suffering of mental health, and how to be in the best mindset possible to heal.

Click to listen to Outer Limits Radio interview.

Dr. Rebecca S. Valla is a Board Certified Psychiatrist with a holistic focus, integrating mindfulness with traditional psychiatry methods. The goal of this approach is to help the client discover his or her life purpose and attain a state of wholeness and self-love.

 

 

 

 

Veterans' NDE Video is now on sale!

Veterans Video CaseThe new video DVD, Understanding Veterans' Near-Death Experiences, is NOW ON SALE ($24.95 IANDS members, $29.95 non-members). Service members who have had an NDE should be assisted by medical personnel or chaplains trained to deal with those who have experienced NDEs. However, because of lack of training, that care is often not available, and the impact of this crucial gap of care can be great. It is traumatizing, exacerbating the effects of already devastating injuries, as well as PTSD, and magnifying feelings of confusion, fear, isolation and hopeless despair. Veterans may carry these feelings for a lifetime. This new IANDS-sponsored Veterans' NDE Training Video provides answers.

donateIANDS and many generous donors contributed $25,000 to produce the video. We are still seeking donations of an additional $15,000 to promote the video to veterans and veteran care givers. See the video trailer on YouTube. Order a copy today!

Vet Video Title Page

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The Self Does Not Die is now available on Amazon

BookCoverThe long-awaited book The Self Does Not Die has now been published by IANDS and is available on Amazon.com. The project involved translating and expanding the Dutch book by NDE researchers Titus Rivas, Anny Dirven and Rudolf Smit. This new edition details 104 cases of veridical perceptions and other verified paranormal aspects of NDEs. Veridical perceptions in NDEs provide the best evidence of the apparent separation of consciousness from the physical body and, by implication, survival of consciousness after death. Available at Amazon & Kindle!

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Study on rats proposes a mechanism for NDEs

White ratJimo Borjigin, PhDA recent study by Jimo Borjigin and colleagues (University of Michigan) reports that highly coherent, global oscillations in the brains of rats occurred from about 12 to 30 seconds after cardiac arrest. The investigators found that near death, some of the electrical signatures of consciousness exceeded levels found in the waking state, providing "strong evidence for the potential of heightened cognitive processing in the near-death state." "The measureable conscious activity is much, much higher after the heart stops." They assert that this evidence provides "a scientific framework to begin to explain the highly lucid and realer-than-real mental experiences reported by near-death survivors."

How well do these assertions hold up to scrutiny?


Commentary by Robert Mays, NDE researcher

There are three major flaws in the reasoning that the University of Michigan researchers used. The first flaw is that a near-death experience, with its elements of the sense of being out of the body, feelings of peace, hyper-real lucid sensations and mentation, and so on, occurs only when an individual is near death. It's important that any explanation of the phenomenon of NDEs explain the broad spectrum of cases in which they occur. NDEs can be triggered by cardiac arrest or a physical trauma, but they can also be triggered by an accident in which the NDEr is not hurt and even in a healthy individual who experiences an NDE spontaneously.

Furthermore, shared-death experiences provide even further evidence where a healthy person at the bedside of a dying loved one experiences many of the same elements of the NDE (see Moody and Perry, Glimpses of Eternity, 2010).

There is no physiological explanation of NDEs and SDEs that can explain the variety of trigger conditions and elements of the experience. So while the results of Dr. Borjigin and colleagues are interesting, they do not provide a scientific framework for explaining NDEs.

The second major flaw in reasoning has to do with the assumption that coherent oscillations in widely separated regions in the brain constitute a general signature of consciousness. In fact, coherent oscillations are neural correlates of consciousness, but are specific to cognitive activity that is directed toward a particular task such as visual spatial attention or directed motor activity. The oscillations tend to be transient, lasting only a few hundreds of milliseconds and the brain regions involved are related to the cognitive task at hand.

In fact the transient pattern of coherent gamma oscillations (25-55 Hz) that were observed in the awake rats in this study prior to anesthesia is typical of consciousness. The coherent oscillations are only a small part of the overall picture of the rat's consciousness. Coherent gamma oscillations are indications only of specific, directed cognitive activity rather than general consciousness. These oscillations always occur in the context of other electrical activity that indicate general consciousness. Thus the result that the gamma oscillations increased significantly in the period after cardiac arrest is not an indication of a heightened general consciousness.

Finally, the third major flaw is that the researchers discounted or ignored the overall power of the electrical activity in the awake rat, where there is clearly consciousness, compared with the greatly reduced power of electrical activity after cardiac arrest. The overall power of electrical activity in the conscious rat is more than 30 times greater than after cardiac arrest. (This is an estimate since I do not have access to the specific data).

There is ample evidence that consciousness is supported only by a certain minimal level of electrical activity. After the cardiac arrest, the rats do not have sufficient electrical brain activity to support consciousness. This conclusion is consistent with EEG studies in humans who experienced cardiac arrest and who immediately lost consciousness.

So what do the highly coherent, global oscillations in the rats indicate? Most likely they are a natural oscillation that occurs in resonant neural circuits when the neural activity of the living rat has ceased. In other words, they are the remnant electrical activity of a dead brain.

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