Donate to the Veterans' NDE Video!

robertamoore2aIANDS is partnering again with Roberta Moore to produce a video for veterans called Near-Death Experience, What Veterans Need to Know. Service members who have had an NDE should be assisted by medical personnel or chaplains trained to deal with those who have experienced NDEs. However, because of lack of training, that care is often not available, and the impact of this crucial gap of care can be great. It is traumatizing, exacerbating the effects of already devastating injuries, as well as PTSD, and magnifying feelings of confusion, fear, isolation and hopeless despair. Veterans may carry these feelings for a lifetime

donateThe Fund Raising Goal for this video project is $25,000. IANDS has contributed $5,000 toward the goal and we are now seeking donations through a Generosity fund raising campaign (powered by Indiegogo). See the promotional video on YouTube.

VeteransNDEVideo Trailer

Read more: ...

2016 Conference Speakers and Workshops Announced

IANDS Reg Banner 900x200 V4 2


Featured Speakers: Anita Moorjani, Suzanne Giesemann, Maggie Callanan, Laurin Bellg, Jeff Olsen, PMH Atwater and many more! Full list of Speakers.

Plus Workshops with Anita Moorjani, Suzanne Giesemann, Maggie Callanan, Scott Taylor, Bill Guggenheim and many more!

Early Bird discounts end soon ... Register Now!

 

registernow

Read more: ...

2016 Conference Registration Is Now Open!

IANDS Reg Banner 900x200 V4 2

Featuring Anita Moorjani, Suzanne Giesemann, Maggie Callanan, Laurin Bellg and many more!
At the Embassy Suites by Hilton – Orlando, Lake Buena Vista South

Near-death experiences (NDEs) and near-death-like experiences often result in a greater sense of well-being and purpose in life. But the journey of integrating the experience is often fraught with challenges as well. NDErs themselves, the professionals who care for them and their families, and NDE educators and researchers, all have a role in helping NDErs stay on the path to healing and wholeness—and in helping humanity to use knowledge of NDEs to pursue this path. We invite you to join us as we explore this path together!

registernow

Read more: ...

Welcome to IANDS' new web site layout!

New Website LayoutWe are pleased to present the new IANDS web site layout! Here are the main improvements:  

  • A new overall "look" with our new logo and style that's easier to read 
  • Responsive layout that scales automatically for mobile devices
  • A simplified menu structure: better organized -- it's easier to find things 
  • An improved NDE submission form: more questions requested by researchers, you can save and complete the form at a later time

We have fixed many problems with the existing site, but there may still be problems: if you find a problem, please report it to us.

Also, there are still a few things we need to complete:

  • Some links on some of the pages may not work properly -- please report them to us
  • Some functions on the Professional Networking Directory will not work right away

Read more: ...

2016 IANDS Conference - Save the Date!

PathsToHealingAndWholeness

Featuring Anita Moorjani, Suzanne Giesemann, Maggie Callanan, Laurin Bellg and many more!
At the Embassy Suites by Hilton – Orlando, Lake Buena Vista South

Near-death experiences (NDEs) and near-death-like experiences often result in a greater sense of well-being and purpose in life. But the journey of integrating the experience is often fraught with challenges as well. NDErs themselves, the professionals who care for them and their families, and NDE educators and researchers, all have a role in helping NDErs stay on the path to healing and wholeness—and in helping humanity to use knowledge of NDEs to pursue this path. We invite you to join us as we explore this path together!

Read more: ...

Diane Corcoran on Coast-to-Coast AM

IANDS President, Diane Corcoran, RN, PhD, Retired Army Colonel was on Coast-to-Coast AM radio program with George Knapp... Sunday, July 19 at 1:00 am.

See the biography at http://www.coasttocoastam.com/guest/corcoran-diane/73852

Veterans who would like to learn more about IANDS' support for veterans please contact IANDS using the email address:

Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

diane corcoran

 

Research request: unusual memories prebirth - age 5

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED - RESEARCH PROJECT
 
P.M.H. AtwaterP.M.H. Atwater, L.H.D. is looking for people who feel very different or odd because of pre-birth memory, birth trauma, being a preemie, or while a baby, toddler, up to the age of five.
 
P.M.H. seeks to refocus on tiny ones, to double-check the work she has already done.  Our tiniest near-death experiencers are different.  Her earlier work in this area is contained in the book The New Children and Near-Death Experiences.
 
Please complete the following items listed here or download the list in this file.
 

Read more: ...

AWARE study initial results are published!

Dr. Sam ParniaThe AWARE study (AWAreness during REsuscitation) is a multi-hospital clinical study of the brain and consciousness during cardiac arrest, including testing the validity of perceptions during the out-of-body part of near-death experiences (NDEs). Dr. Sam Parnia is the principal investigator. The initial results, from the first four years of the study, were published last December in the medical journal Resuscitation (PDF). 

Of the 2,060 cardiac arrests during the study, 140 patients survived and could be interviewed for the study. Of these, 101 patients had detailed interviews, which identified 9 patients who had an NDE. Of the 9 NDErs, two had detailed memories with awareness of the physical environment. One NDEr's experience was verified as accurate; the other was too ill for an in-depth interview. These two NDEs occurred in non-acute areas where no visual target was present, so further verification of visual awareness was not possible. Further study and, perhaps, a reassessment of the methodology and goals of the study are warranted. Read more...

Read more: ...

IANDS featured in extensive article in The Atlantic

Gideon Lichfield, The AtlanticA recent article in The Atlantic by Gideon Lichfield provides a fair and balanced presentation of near-death experiences and features IANDS prominently, from the recent 2014 Conference in Newport Beach. Lichfield interviewed IANDS President Diane Corcoran and several NDE researchers including Alan Hugenot, Mitch Liester, Robert Mays and Kim Clark Sharp.

Lichfield explores the physiological as well as transpersonal explanations of NDEs, including the similarity of NDE narratives to the archetypal hero's quest of Joseph Campbell. He brings in the evidence of veridical perceptions in NDEs that have been elusive in NDE studies, including the AWARE study of cardiac arrest patients, as well as the recent EEG study on rats at the end of life. Finally, Lichfield balances the skepticism of Susan Blackmore (from a recent email exchange) with the thought that even materialists "can learn a great deal from NDEs ... about the central role that the [NDE] stories we tell play in shaping our sense of who we are."

Documentary on NDE Aftereffects in development

Aftereffects DocumentaryActor and filmmaker Robert Neal Marshall and IANDS Group Leader Yvonne Sneeden have teamed up to produce a documentary, Back From the Light,  on near-death experience aftereffects that will include perspectives from the NDEr, the NDEr's family and NDE researchers. Both Robert and Yvonne are NDErs. The viewpoint of the family members of NDErs has not been covered much in the NDE literature or film.

View the trailer for the movie. You can also make a contribution to help complete the film. More...

Read more: ...

Eben Alexander answers skeptics' criticisms

EbenAlexander3Sam Harris, Ph.D.In October,a Newsweek article featured an excerpt from neurosurgeon Eben Alexander's new book, Proof of Heaven. Several skeptics wrote articles critical of Dr. Alexander's Newsweek account, notably neuroscientist Sam Harris. Harris disputes that Alexander's cortex was shut down which allowed the “hyper-real” experience of heaven Alexander reported. While the severity and duration of the meningitis infection, the resulting coma, an enhanced CT scan and neurological examinations all indicate global impairment of the neocortex which would not support consciousness, to Harris these constitute only secondary evidence and consciousness could still have been possible. For Harris, complete brain inactivity can be demonstrated only by brain imaging like fMRI and EEG. It should be noted that while he has a Ph.D. in neuroscience, Harris does not practice neuroscience and is not a clinician.

Alexander responded to these criticisms on Alex Tsakiris' Skeptiko podcast.

 

Specifically Alexander responded to Harris:

"Isolated preservation of cortical regions might have explained some elements of my experience, but certainly not the overall odyssey of rich experiential tapestry. The severity of my meningitis and its refractoriness to therapy for a week should have eliminated all but the most rudimentary of conscious experiences: peripheral white blood cell [WBC] count over 27,000 per mm3, 31 percent bands with toxic granulations, CSF WBC count over 4,300 per mm3, CSF glucose down to 1.0 mg/dl (normally 60-80, may drop down to ~ 20 in severe meningitis), CSF protein 1,340 mg/dl, diffuse meningeal involvement and widespread blurring of the gray-white junction, diffuse edema, with associated brain abnormalities revealed on my enhanced CT scan, and neurological exams showing severe alterations in cortical function (from posturing to no response to noxious stimuli, florid papilledema, and dysfunction of extraocular motility [no doll's eyes, pupils fixed], indicative of brainstem damage).  Going from symptom onset to coma within 3 hours is a very dire prognostic sign, conferring 90% mortality at the very beginning, which only worsened over the week. No physician who knows anything about meningitis will just “blow off” the fact that I was deathly ill in every sense of the word, and that my neocortex was absolutely hammered. Anyone who simply concludes that “since I did so well I could not have been that sick” is begging the question, and knows nothing whatsoever about severe bacterial meningitis."

In a second blog article in response to the Skeptiko podcast, Harris seems not to have read Alexander's comments on Skeptiko—nor Alexander's book—very carefully, stating "I find that my original criticism of Alexander’s thinking can stand without revision" and further stating:

"[Alexander] doesn’t understand what would constitute compelling evidence of cortical inactivity. The proof he offers is either fallacious (CT scans do not detect brain activity) or irrelevant (it does not matter, even slightly, that his form of meningitis was “astronomically rare”)—and no combination of fallacy and irrelevancy adds up to sound science. The impediment to taking Alexander’s claims seriously can be simply stated: There is absolutely no reason to believe that his cerebral cortex was inactive at the time he had his experience of the afterlife. The fact that Alexander thinks he has demonstrated otherwise—by continually emphasizing how sick he was, the infrequency of E. coli meningitis, and the ugliness of his initial CT scan—suggests a deliberate disregard of the most plausible interpretation of his experience. It is far more likely that some of his cortex was functioning, despite the profundity of his illness...."

Specifically, Harris did not address the "diffuse meningeal involvement and widespread blurring of the gray-white junction, diffuse edema, with associated brain abnormalities" nor the neurological exams all of which indicate severe damage to the cortex and brainstem.

Alexander examined nine neuroscientific hypotheses that might explain his experience, including the hypothesis that some isolated cortical networks may have been functioning. That explanation would not explain the robust, richly interactive nature of his recollections.

Harris points to the fact that Alexander remembered his NDE "suggests that the cortical and subcortical structures necessary for memory formation were active at the time". Harris dismisses the possibility that memory as a function of consciousness may also be—as Alexander contends—independent of the brain. If the memories are stored outside Alexander's brain, they are "presumably somewhere between Lynchburg, Virginia, and heaven".

Finally, Harris completely misreads Alexander's account of coming to recognize that the beautiful girl on the butterfly wing was his deceased sister Betsy, whom he had never met because he had been adopted. Harris characterizes this as "wishful thinking" and "self-deception leading to a distortion of memory":

"While in his coma, he saw a beautiful girl riding beside him on the wing of a butterfly. We learn in his book that he developed his recollection of this experience over a period of months—writing, thinking about it, and mining it for new details. It would be hard to think of a better way to engineer a distortion of memory."

If Harris had read a little more carefully, he would have realized that Alexander's memories were vivid at the time he regained consciousness and that he wrote down every detail of his journeys in the six weeks after his recovery. The memories were "right there, crisp and clear". Then four months after his recovery, he received the photograph of his deceased sister.

"She looked so strangely, hauntingly familiar. But of course, she would look that way. We were blood relations and shared more DNA than any other people on the planet...."

The next morning, after reading a story about a child NDEr who met her deceased brother but wasn't aware she had a brother, Alexander recognized that his deceased sister was the beautiful girl on the butterfly wing.

Share this post

Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Connect

twitter  you tube  google plus  facebook

Share

Explore the Extraordinary